Noisette of Lamb with Red Wine, Red Currant and Rosemary

Noisette of Lamb with Red Wine, Red Currant and Rosemary
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Noisette of Lamb with Red Wine, Red Currant and Rosemary
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Servings Prep Time Cook Time Passive Time
4 30minutes 50minutes 240minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 30minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
50minutes 240minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
Units:
Ingredients
Servings:
Units:
Instructions
  1. Chop the rosemary leaves finely and put in a bowl with the wine and jelly. Cut garlic clove into two or three chunks and crush each chunk with the flat of the knife's blade, then add to the rest of the marinade ingredients. Stir to combine. If the jelly refuses to dissolve into the wine, zap it in the microwave for a few seconds.
  2. Cool marinade, if needed, put the meat in a large freezer bag and pour in the marinade. Seal the bag with as little air in it as possible and place in the fridge, on a large plate in case of leakage, until a couple of hours before you want to cook it.
  3. At least an hour before you want to cook the meat, take it out of the fridge to come to room temperature.
  4. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Place the lamb in a roasting pan and rub with the oil. Strain the marinade into a jar then pour about a half into the roasting pan; reserve the rest. Add cold water to the tin so that there is about 1/16th inch depth of liquid (ie a thin layer coating the entire bottom). Bake 15 minutes and then reduce the heat to 350°F. Baste with the pan juices and then roast for a further 25-35 minutes, until themometer reads 145°F.
  5. Once the meat is cooked, remove to a warm serving plate and tent with foil to keep it hot whilst you make a gravy. Strain the juices from the roasting pan into a small saucepan add the reserved marinade and bring to the boil, stirring occassionally. If the gravy is very thin, carefully whisk in the cornstarch slurry until thickened, return to a boil while whisking lightly. Strain though a sieve and cheesecloth to remove sucs. Serve the sauce alongside the meat, carved into thick rounds.
About the Author

Michael Farnum

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I have spent the better half of five decades honing my culinary interest and developing my gastronomical palate, such as it is. I began this journey when I was 10, much to my Dad’s concern for his grocery bills. As a Letter Carrier with a wife and two kids, he could ill afford my experimentation. He finally relented and began teaching me the fundamentals he learned as a navy cook and from a Southern family he befriended after he migrated from Trinidad after the war (WWII). By my junior year in high school I was preparing family dinners, since I usually got home before them. I have a particular fondness for French, Creole, and Trinidadian cuisines; and I attended the French Culinary Institute, later in life. In addition, I am a member of both The American Culinary Federation and the James Beard Foundation. In semi-retirement from an Information Technology career, I am now developing a food trade business with designer marinades and sauces, specialty jams & jellies and other goodies under the Menu by Mike label.